Milestones in watch history         FILTER BY ITEMS PUBLISHED IN THE ACE LIST

1884 Greenwich Mean Time

In 1884 27 nations agreed on a system in which time on Earth was counted from the Meridian through the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England. In 1890 many countries decided in Dresden to divide the Earth into 24 time zones, with one hour of difference between adjacent time zones. This is the system that is still operative today.
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1916 Heuer's Mikrograph

Heuer (in 1985 it became TAG Heuer) created in 1916 the Mikrograph, that could measure time to 1/100th of a second. In 1966 Heuer developed the Mikrotimer that measured time to 1/1,000th of a second. In 1976 Heuer introduced a timing system for car racing, in 2002 the Mikrograph was relaunched and the Mikrotimer followed.
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1955 Atomic Time

In 1955 the first accurate atomic clock was built by Louis Essen at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK. It was a caesium clock with a maximum deviation of one second per million years. Nowadays, atomic clocks are based on rubidium and other elements, are much smaller and are essential for mobile phone systems or GPS.
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1969 The Quartz Revolution

In 1969 Swiss engineers built the first quartz movement for wrist watches: calibre Beta-21. Swiss managers didn’t believe that it could be produced cheaply. However, Seiko (Japan) had also produced a quartz movement. Japanese engineers were masters of miniaturization and within a short time cheap but accurate quartz watches started flooding the market.
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1985 The Mechanical Renaissance

This is the return of the mechanical watch movement. Although the quartz movement almost made mechanical watchmaking obsolete, a couple of watchmakers stubbornly continued making movements with springs and balance wheels. And over the years, the mechanical watch became much loved again, especially in the luxury watch market. It’s a miracle!
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